Tours

Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mine
The Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company ("CC&V") operates the current day Cresson operations, the largest gold mine in Colorado just outside of Victor. A guided tour of the mine is offered during the summer months.

Driving through the area you will see signs of active mining in just about every phase. From the valley fill/gold recovery operation along Highway 67 near the Little Grouse Mountain Overview, to the surface mine seen from the American Eagles Scenic Overlook, you will gain a perspective of the modern gold mining methods keeping Victor’s gold mining legacy alive. CC&V is a joint venture operation between AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp and GCGC.  AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp is a wholly owned subsidiary of AngloGold Ashanti North America Inc. CC&V headquarters are in downtown Victor.

Tours are about 2 1/2 hours in length and begin at the Victor Lowell Thomas Museum in Victor, Colorado, promptly at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Be sure to arrive 15 minutes prior to your tour time to sign waivers and view a safety video. Reservation holders who do not arrive 15 minutes early may be replaced with a standby and your reservation will not be refunded.

 Maximum on each tour is 13 for morning tours and 14 for afternoon tours (van capacity).
 Cost of the tour is $5 per person.
All cancellations and changes are subject to cancellation fee of $2.50 per person.  Cancellations or changes
must be made at least 24 hours prior to 9 am on the
tour reservation date.  All cancellations or changes made within 24 hours of the tour reservation date will not
be refunded.
 All tour participants must sign a release form; parents of children under 18
must sign the release form for the children.
 No children under 5 are allowed on tours.
 Tour participants must wear closed toe shoes (no sandals allowed) and will
be required to wear hardhats and safety glasses provided by CC&V.
 To make a reservation by phone, please call 719-689-4211 and leave a message
with your tour date and time desired.

2010 Mine Tour Schedule:
10 a.m. & 1 p.m.
June – Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday
July-Sept. 4 – Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday.

Florissant Fossil Beds 

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument can be a great place to visit any time of the year. During the summer there are a variety of ranger led programs such as interpretive talks and ranger guided walks.

Throughout the year there are a variety of self-guided hikes and over 14 miles of hiking trails. The junior ranger program is also available year round for younger visitors.

The fossils, rocks, hills, and valleys that make up Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument reveal to us an ancient story of redwood forests, volcanic eruptions, and a climate much different than today. In addition to a rich ancient history, the Florissant valley also contains the stories of prehistoric hunting and gathering Paleo-Indians, the Ute and Jicarilla Apache peoples, the travels of a pioneer nation, and of early scientists making their way through discovery into a different time.

Summer Hours (June – Labor Day, 2010):
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM every day of the week.

Fall, Winter, Spring Hours:
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM, except for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Days.

Florissant Fossil Beds is only open to the public for day use. Park access is prohibited during
closed hours except by permit.

ENTRANCE FEES IMPORTANT!!! 
Fees and passes can only be purchased with CASH or CHECK. No credit or debit cards.
Individuals:
$3 (Good for 7 Days)
This is a per person charge for individuals 16 years old or older. Anyone under the age of 16 years
is free.
Local Passport: 
$15 (Good for one year)
Good for cardholder and immediate family for entrance to Florissant Fossil Beds National
Monument
Federal Passes:
Golden Age, Golden Access, Golden Eagle, and National Park Passes will continue to be accepted at the visitor center until they expire. Please show them to the ranger at the visitor center desk. PLEASE NOTE: The above mentioned passes can no longer be purchased as they have been
replaced by the following passes.

1) America the Beautiful, National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Annual Pass Cost $80. This pass is available to the general public and provides access to, and use of, Federal recreation sites that charge an Entrance or Standard Amenity Fee for a year, beginning from the date of sale. The pass admits the pass holder/s and passengers in a non-commercial vehicle at per vehicle fee areas and pass holder + 3 adults, not to exceed 4 adults, at per person fee areas.
(children under 16 are admitted free) The pass can be obtained in person at the park, by calling 1- 888-ASK USGS, Ext. 1, or via the Internet at http://store.usgs.gov/pass.

2) America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Senior Pass. Cost $10. This is a lifetime pass for U.S. citizens or permanent residents age 62 or over. The pass provides access to, and use of, Federal recreation sites that charge an Entrance or Standard Amenity. The pass admits the pass holder and passengers in a non-commercial vehicle at per vehicle fee areas and pass holder + 3 adults, not to exceed 4 adults, at per person fee areas
(children under 16 are admitted free). The pass can only be obtained in person at the park. The Senior Pass provides a 50 percent discount on some Expanded Amenity Fees charged for facilities and services such as camping, swimming, boat launch, and specialized interpretive services. In some cases where Expanded Amenity Fees are charged, only the pass holder will be given the 50 percent price reduction. The pass is non-transferable and generally does NOT cover or reduce
special recreation permit fees or fees charged by concessionaires.

3) America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Access Pass. Free. This is a lifetime pass for U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities. Documentation is required to obtain the pass. Acceptable documentation includes: statement by a licensed physician; document issued by Federal agency such as the Veteran’s Administration, Social Security Disability Income or Supplemental Security Income; or document issued by a State
agency such as a vocational rehabilitation agency. The pass provides access to, and use of, Federal recreation sites that charge an Entrance or Standard Amenity. The pass admits the pass holder and passengers in a non-commercial vehicle at per vehicle fee areas and pass holder + 3 adults, not to exceed 4 adults, at per person fee areas (children under 16 are admitted free). The pass can only be obtained in person at the park. The Senior Pass provides a 50 percent discount
on some Expanded Amenity Fees charged for facilities and services such as camping, swimming, boat launching, and specialized interpretive services. In some cases where Expanded Amenity Fees are charged, only the pass holder will be given the 50 percent price reduction. The pass is non-transferable and generally does NOT cover or reduce special recreation permit fees or fees charged by concessionaires.

4) America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Volunteer Pass Free. This pass is for volunteers acquiring 500 service hours on a cumulative basis. It provides access to, and use of, Federal recreation sites that charge an Entrance or Standard Amenity Fee for a year, beginning from the date of award. The pass admits the pass holder and passengers in a non-commercial vehicle at per vehicle fee areas and pass holder + 3 adults, not to exceed 4 adults,
at per person fee areas (children under 16 are admitted free).

Fee Waivers
Groups may be eligible to apply for a fee waiver. To meet these requirements your group must be a tax-exempt group that is coming to the Monument for educational or scientific purposes. Educational institutions must be accredited or otherwise recognized as a bonafide educational institution. The visit must support specific, for-credit curriculum as its purpose. The park resources and facilities must be related to the educational purpose of the visit.

Florissant Pioneer Cemetery 
The Florissant Pioneer Cemetery is located at 634 County Road #421 (Upper Twin Rocks Road) in Florissant, Colorado.

Florissant began as a Ute Trading Post built by Judge James Castello in June, 1870. In 1873, Judge Castello applied for an official post office which he named “Florissant” after his hometown in Missouri. Hundreds of pioneers flooded into the area, but were unable to file for legal title to homesteads until a survey
of the Pikes Peak region was published in 1876. Nonetheless, the ebb and flow of life continued. Numerous graves, many with simple wooden markers, began to dot the hillsides of this peaceful little valley before you. The earliest legible marker is the granite headstone of a child who died in 1874. It is located in the historic
section of the cemetery which is west of the flag pole.

On April 3, 1888, Frank Castello (son of James) and his neighbor John Wilson applied to El Paso County (Teller County was carved out of El Paso County 1899) for a “Florissant Cemetery Association” with themselves as Trustees. In November 1900, Frank Castello applied to have only himself named Trustee of the Florissant Cemetery Association. The record is vague after this date, and the cemetery fell into disrepair. The Florissant Heritage Foundation (renamed Pikes Peak Historical Society in 2001) began voluntary maintenance in 1988. In March, 1992, the District Court in Teller County named the Foundation as Trustee
of the Cemetery.

When you visit our Pioneer Cemetery, remember that you are walking on hallowed ground. Please treat it as
such. The Pikes Peak Historical Society offers a $500 reward for information on any vandals.

 

Mt. Pisgah Cemetery Tours

History, and the ghosts from th(Click Link)e past, come to life during the annual "Mt. Pisgah Speaks Cemetery Tour & The Gold Camp Victorian Society, dedicated to the preservation of the history of Cripple Creek, hosts this unique tour. Complete with character reenactments at different locations through the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery, and fascinating characters that lived in this area and are buried in the Mt. Pisgah cemetery.
Date:
The tours will only take place on one day, Saturday, September 18, 2010. Don't miss this event and get here early!
Time:
Tours will leave every half hour starting at 9:30 a.m. The last tour will leave the District Museum at 2:00 p.m.

Parking:
Visitors are asked to park at the Cripple Creek District Museum, located at 5th Street and Bennett Avenue, next to the Cripple Creek & Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad Depot. Cripple Creek’s historic trolley will take visitors from the museum to the cemetery – please do not park at the cemetery.
Concerns:
This walking tour may be difficult for people with health problems.
Donations:
Donations benefit the Gold Camp Victorian Society's historic preservation efforts.
The following donations are requested:
$8.00 per Adult
$15.00 per Couple
$5.00 per Child under 12

Victor Sunnyside Cemetery
Explore the history of Victor’s Sunnyside Cemetery. Just south of town off 7th Street and a short county road, the cemetery includes graves of young and old who pioneered the gold camp. The earliest found marker dates 1891. Historical records inscribed on tombstones with names, dates and sometimes far-away places brings to the heart and mind the people who have come to the "City of Mine& turn of the 19th century pioneers and their children, hard-rock miners, veterans and soldiers from five different wars, as well as many other individuals, are at final rest on this beautiful knoll. Stone carvings, intricate ironwork, and
weathered wooden cribs pay tribute to the unique character of those who lived their lives in Victor, Colorado.

American Eagles Overlook
The American Eagles Drive starts in Victor at 3rd & Diamond and continues up Range View Road to the marked intersection. The road winds up over remnants of the ghost town of Independence and then Altman. At the top, displays of mining equipment, a blacksmith shop and the grand American Eagles headframe offers a glimpse into gold mining history. Be sure to visit the Vindicator Trail when in the area. Located near the Gold Belt National Byway, this stunning, historic overlook is leased by Teller County from the Cripple Creek and Victor Mining Company.

The Butte Theater
The stage for drama was set when gold fever hit Cripple Creek in 1890. A gold rush of major proportions was underway at the turn of the 20th century and a boomtown atmosphere called for entertainment galore. Tired, thirsty and hungry, miners preferred the society of the gambling halls and saloons that lined the streets of the mining district. Madams, dance hall girls and medicine shows were the preferred entertainment of the less cultured, working element. Booze, gambling and debauchery prevailed. But there was also a more sophisticated lot who still yearned for the niceties of a society that they had left behind. Moving West, where social dress and fine dining was as scarce as running water, was quite a hardship for the socially inclined.

Early on, Cripple Creek and Victor both sported grand opera houses, providing much needed access to theatre, music and art. Such notable acts as Texas Guinan, Lily Langtree and Groucho Marx all performed in early Cripple Creek at one time or another.

Early in 1999, the City of Cripple Creek brushed aside some of the dust and saw a lost jewel hidden amongst the rubble. The City began extensive renovations to refurbish the Butte with fresh paint, Victorian-era wallpaper, and period chandeliers. A 1,350-square foot stage spans the main room, with seating for 174 guests. The sound booth is equipped with state-of-the-art movie projectors and sound equipment. A snack bar and roomy dressing rooms complete the theater’s amenities.

Get More information About the Butte Theater & 2010 Season:
The Butte Theater
139 E. Bennett Ave.
Cripple Creek, CO 80813
Call: 719-689-6402

Cripple Creek & Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad
A trip on the Cripple Creek & Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad, reveals scenic wonders around every curve as century-old steam locomotive transports you back to the gold mining days of Cripple Creek & Victor, Colorado. A treat for railroad and history buffs, kids and the whole family.

Trains leave every 40 minutes from mid-May thru mid-October from our 1894 depot and gift shop at the head of historic Bennett Avenue in Cripple Creek.
Take this spectacular 45-minute trip of beautiful colors and fascinating experiences…the old steam engine with its pillaring smoke, sounds of steam and working steel…all the effects familiar to the hardy miners who rode the Midland Terminal roadbed when Cripple Creek District’s population approached over 50,000.

This unique four-mile round- trip includes an interesting and educational narration on the rich history only a dynamic gold town could produce. Also stops for special points of interest, impressive photo spots, and Echo valley.

You will enjoy every minute of the ride and will have a better knowledge of this world-famous town…. Cripple
Creek, Colorado.
Cripple Creek & Victor
Narrow Gauge Railroad
5th & Bennett Ave.
Cripple Creek, CO 80813
(719)689-2640
Ticket Rates
Adults $12.25*
Children ages 3-12 years $7.75
Seniors over 65 $11.25
Group Prices Available
$1 OFF FOR AAA & Active Military with ID

CALL AHEAD FOR MORE INFO
719-689-2640 OR FAX 719-689-3256

Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center
 Come walk with one of our experienced and knowledgeable guides, and learn why it is important to preserve our diminishing wildlife — not only for their existence but ours as well.

Our personalized, ONE-HOUR WALKING TOURS through the sanctuary are fun and educational. We guarantee an up-close view of the beautiful, majestic and elusive wolf. We consider ourselves not only a sanctuary for animals but for people too!

Tours last between 60-75 minutes on average. Please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

Tours are conducted year-round Tuesday through Sunday at 10am, 12pm, and 2pm plus 4pm in the spring/summer seasons. All tours are by reservation only. During May through August we will also schedule special private tour sessions at 5pm for groups of 10 or more. We welcome school groups, cub/boy/girl
scout groups, nature enthusiasts, work parties and any other organization you may belong to.

 PRICING and RULES STANDARD TOUR:
The Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center survives solely on your donations. In order to provide for these animals,
we require a non-refundable fee of:
$10 Per Adult
$7 Per Child (12 & under)
CWWC is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) charity, and any donations are tax-deductible. Please ask us for a donation receipt.

VIP TOUR:
During a VIP tour, you and your friends/family will enjoy the standard tour followed by an additional half-hour interaction inside our Ambassador Wolf enclosures!

You will be considered our “special volunteers for the day,” and get an up close and personal experience with our socialized wolves. Wolf kisses are common so don’t forget your camera!* IT IS AN EXPERIENCE YOU WILL NEVER FORGET!

We ask for a fee of $150 for the first 2 people and $50 for each additional person (up to 6) in a family/friend group together. (Space is limited per tour time so ask about VIP availability when you reserve.)

****NOTE: Guests must be 18 or older to participate. Dress for play; Wear only hiking boots or closed toed shoes. Do not wear crocks, sandals or any shoes that allows your foot or toes to be exposed, expensive jewelry, down coats, leather, suede, fur clothing, fur/flux trimmed collars or boots.

Due to the potential risks involved in entering the wolf enclosures, you will be required to sign a liability waiver before you go on the tour. Unfortunately, we cannot allow persons who are handicapped mentally or physically, pregnant, person(s) with medical conditions and/or medical devices (e.g., oxygen tanks, walkers, canes, colostomy bags, etc.) or frail elderly persons. Staff will make the determination at the time of the interaction to determine if the individual(s) is physically fit to enter the enclosure. If the VIP tour has been prepaid, the money will be fully refunded.
 Driving Directions
 Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center is in Divide, CO. Your GPS will not be accurate and will be off by at least
1⁄2 mile shy so it is best to follow the directions below.

FROM COLORADO SPRINGS ··· 1 HOUR
Heading west on U.S. Hwy. 24 (for approx. 26 miles) you will go through Woodland Park and come to a small town called Divide. There will be a stop light in the center of town. Head straight or west for 1.5 miles where you will see a BLUE state directional sign that says COLORADO WOLF AND WILDLIFE CENTER
with an arrow that is telling you to turn left. Immediately after, you will see a GREEN state sign that says TWIN ROCKS ROAD. Make that left onto CR 42 Twin Rocks Road and travel exactly 1.5 miles. The wolf center is on the right with a wolf statue on a large bolder. Landmarks prior to the Twin Rocks Road turn off
on left side of Hwy 24 as you are heading west: Sherwood Forest Estates · Crescent Cabins · Big red barn building

FROM BRECKENRIDGE ··· 1.5 HOURS
Take CO-9 south for about 21 miles. Turn left (east) onto Hwy 24 for approximately 38 miles. Turn right (southwest) – almost a U-turn – onto Lower Twin Rock Road or Twin Rocks Road or CR-42. There is a red barn on the left side just PAST the turn. Travel exactly 1.5 miles. The wolf center is on the right with a wolf
statue on a large bolder. If you see a Sherwood Forest subdivision sign on your right on Hwy 24, you went too far… turn around.

FROM DENVER ··· 2 HOURS
Take I-25 south into Colorado Springs and take the Cimarron (Hwy 24) exit 141 – heading west for approximately 26 miles. You will go through Woodland Park and come to a small town called Divide. There will be a stop light in the center of town. Head straight or west for 1.5 miles where you will see a BLUE state
directional sign that says COLORADO WOLF AND WILDLIFE CENTER with an arrow that is telling you to turn left. Immediately after, you will see a GREEN state sign that says TWIN ROCKS ROAD. Make that left onto CR 42 Twin Rocks Road and travel exactly 1.5 miles. The wolf center is on the right with a wolf statue on a large bolder. Landmarks prior to the Twin Rocks Road turn off on left side of Hwy 24 as you are heading west: Sherwood Forest Estates · Crescent Cabins · Big red barn building.

Cripple Creek Fire Station #3 
The Cripple Creek Fire Department Station # 3 was completed in 1900 to provide protection from a reoccurrence of the city’s two catastrophic fires of 1896 which burned 47 acres of the city and destroyed more than 400 buildings.

The Museum is operated by the City of Cripple Creek to commemorate the service of our brave firefighters throughout the years. It houses numerous displays and photographs of the unique firefighting history of Cripple Creek.

The Memorial Wall
The citizens of Cripple Creek established this memorial as a place to reflect on the sacrifices for our freedom. Any members of our Armed Forces that have been killed in action since September 11, 2001 and were stationed at one of our five area installations, had a home of record in El Paso or Teller County, or were Air Force Academy graduates will be listed on the wall in remembrance of their service and sacrifice.  The Pikes Peak Region’s Memorial Wall is constructed of Colorado Red granite and other native materials and is open daily.

Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine
The Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine is perched 10,000 feet above sea level, on the Southwest slope of Pikes Peak, and is centrally located among more than 30 major Pikes Peak area attractions.

One of nearly 500 gold producing shaft mines, of the historic Cripple Creek Gold Mining District, The Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine is without a doubt the Country’s most unique and fascinating mine tour adventures.

From the early beginnings of the Mollie Kathleen Mine, many passers-by would often wander-in, pleading to tour the underground mine.

Working miners would take turns guiding complete strangers on underground mine tours where fellow miners were extracting gold ore.

Once the word got around that people off the street could descend the shaft and tour workings 1,000 feet underground, demand for tours rapidly grew to the point touring soon became disruptive to mining operations.

America’s Only Vertical Shaft Gold Mine Tour
Upon arrival, you will be introduced to your tour guide. Each miner/guide shares personalized insight into unique Cripple Creek gold mining methods and techniques as well as a fascinating history of & The World’s Greatest Gold Camp".

During a two-minute 1,000-foot vertical shaft descent, touring guests will experience what many feel is like a time travel back to gold mining's heyday. Throughout the well-lit shaft, while dropping below several levels of mine workings, visitors becomes infused with a strong spirt of the "Old West Hard Rock Gold Miner.

General Admission
Adults $15
Ch 3-12 $10
2-under Free
Mollie Kathleen Gold Mine
9388 Hwy 67
Cripple Creek, CO 80813
719 689 2466

Pikes Peak Heritage Center 
The Pikes Peak Heritage Center located at the entrance to Cripple Creek, Colorado offers visitors a great opportunity to get a real "feel" for this Pikes Peak mountain community and region. The new state-of-the-art interpretive center overlooks the town of Cripple Creek.

The Pikes Peak Heritage Center encourages visitors to learn about the area through a variety of 21st century displays. Displays include a model railroad display depicting the historic gold camp railways. There is also a brand-new art gallery featuring local artists with a Native American theme.

The Pikes Peak Heritage Center is an 11,600-square-foot facility built to mirror the historic building styles found in Cripple creek and the nearby mining town of Victor, Colorado. The Center features interactive displays that allow visitors to feel themselves become part of the past glory days of this famous gold mining camp. A variety of displays showcase historic photography, flora and fauna, the regions unique dinosaur discoveries. Of course, no display would be complete without Pikes Peak "America’s Mountain.

Visitors to the Pikes Peak Heritage Center also learn about gold mining, geology, and the human history of the Pikes Peak region. You'll also find current information about Teller County recreational activities and attractions.

Hours of Operation
April 2 – October 31:
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. seven days a week
November 1 – March 31:
10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. daily
Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day
Admission Price
FREE ADMISSION
Location
9283 S. Highway 67 Cripple Creek, CO
Cripple Creek, CO 80813
P.O. Box 430
719-689-3315
877-858-4653

The Historic Victor Hotel 
The Victor Hotel is a historic hotel in the mining town of Victor, Colorado. The hotel is a four-story Victorian brick building built in 1899-1900 by the town’s founders, the Woods brothers. It is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Built of brick and stone, 1899-1900, this four-story structure was once considered the most modern edifice in the Cripple Creek District. The first floor of the building was originally the Citizen’s Bank of Victor. It may be the only banking concern in the world where one of its depositors mined directly beneath the bank at five hundred feet from the surface. [1]

The building contained the offices of some of the most prominent men and businesses in Victor, including Dean Merrill Bodwell, J.W. Huff, J.E. Ferguson, Davis and Byler and H.G. Thomas, physician and father of Lowell Thomas. There were also the businesses of the Colorado Telephone Company, the Western Union
Telegraph Company and H.H. Rosser.

After the Woods fell from power, A.E. Carlton bought the Bank Building, establishing his City Bank on the first floor. The second and third floors remained offices, but the fourth floor was converted unto a hospital, where operations, such as an emergency appendectomy, were performed as early as 1906.

In 1908, the building contained both a grocery and jewelry store as well as the City Bank. The City Bank failed during the depression.

In the 1930s, the bottom floor consisted of the Brass Rail Café and Bar, Bill Lehrs photography studio, and the lobby area contained Barretts furniture. Activity ceased during the Second World War.

In the mid-1950s and early 1960s there were various operations including a restaurant, Henry Munsteds gift shop and Reindels soda fountain. The 1960s brought an end to activity at the bank building.

Over the next two decades neglect brought the building to a dilapidated state. The property was purchased in October of 1991, by the Victor Hotel Limited Liability Company with Ivan S. Parr, of Conifer, Colorado as Manager.

The renovation process was begun that same month under the supervision of Marjoe D. Bandimere of Arvada, Colorado. The demolition phase was completed by spring of 1992. This phase was made more difficult because it was undertaken during especially harsh winter conditions (at times the workmen’s sandwiches and coffee froze).

The reconstruction phase began in mid-March and was finished in August 1992. The overall goal was to completely rebuild the hotel and restaurant in accordance with current building regulations and requirements while retaining as much of the historic elements as possible.

The original Bird Cage elevator was retrofitted, the original woodwork was stripped and reused, and the original steam radiators were painted and replaced complete with individual thermostat controls. The objective was to provide modern standards of lodging and dining within a nationally registered historic
building.

The Victor Trading Company 
Colorado’s most unique shop. Step back in time with a working broom-shop, tin-shop and letterpress print- shop. Hand-made goods using tools from Victor’s heyday, 1900. This is a working museum with the world famous “Broom Wall”.
The Victor Trading Co. & Manufacturing Works, LLC
114 South Third Street
Victor, Colorado 80860-0053
(719)689-2346